pregnancy

Pubis Pain aka “Lightning Crotch” or Pelvic Pain During Pregnancy: Part 2

Part 2 - Managing pubic symphysis dysfunction through exercise

Not sure what pubic symphysis dysfunction is or the causes? Check out Part 1 for more information!

The most important thing to know is that each mama is unique in her needs. For that reason, it is important to see a chiropractor or physical therapist with additional training in pregnancy and postpartum to find out what your specific needs are. With that being said, there are some general guidelines. Y’all know by now that I love mamas to stay active during pregnancy but there are some exercises that are best modified or taken out when you have SPD.

The ‘Don’ts’ of exercising with pubic symphysis pain (exercises to avoid with lightning crotch):

  • Don’t over-stretch

    • Yes, it is possible to over-stretch, especially during pregnancy when relaxin and progesterone are helping muscles and ligaments relax in order to prepare for birth. If you are doing yoga or pilates, it’s a great idea to not push mobility at the end of any pose as this can increase your risk fo stretching too much and destabilizing the pelvis

  • Avoid single leg movements for a few weeks (2-3 weeks) and slowly add them back in yo see if you can manage the load. If not, that’s OK and take them back out. If they do not increase or cause pain, it’s a great idea to add them back!

    • This includes taking out lunges, bulgarian split squats, pistol squats, warrior pose, assault bike, and step ups as all of these exercises are one-leg dominant and can increase shearing on the pelvis

  • Avoid traditional “core” exercises 

  • Traditional core exercises like sit-ups and crunches focus on activating one or two muscles independently of the core system (diaphragm, pelvic floor and all abdominal and back musculature). Working these muscles can actually pull on the pubic rami and increase pain. Core exercises like the plank are advanced and require full pelvic/core stability and joint centration (the pelvic floor and diaphragm should be aligned). It is common for mamas to compensate during this movement as their natural gravity shifts and this compensation can lead to increased pelvic and low back instability.

  • No deep squats or sumo squats

    • I love deep squats because the bottom of a squat is when the pelvic floor is most relaxed (hello benefits in labor) BUT that stretch can be too much with pelvic pain and is best to be avoided

  • Adductor stretch or adductor machines 

    • The adductors are connected to both the inner thigh and the pelvis and can definitely play a role in pelvic pain. Like most everything, it is best to figure out if the adductors need relaxed or strengthened. If you are constantly stretching and they don’t feel better, they may actually need strengthened! Vice versa, if you’ve been working hard to strengthen the adductors but they continue to be sore, you may need to calm the signal from the brain to down regulate this pain. The best way to know this is to see a professional who can guide you in what your body currently needs.

  • Fast/explosive movements 

    • We want to continue moving during pregnancy but fast and explosive movements require the musculature around the pelvis to respond quickly and when there is pain this reaction is often slower. It is easier to compensate and not utilize the appropriate muscles to create the force to stabilize

Exercises that may improve pubic symphysis pain

  • Focus on posture and pelvic alignment

    • As you stand and walk your diaphragm should be aligned with your pelvic floor — this is a neutral spine. If you drop into too much anterior or posterior pelvic tilt this can increase pain/pressure on the pubic region. So one easy exercise to stand in front of a mirror and focus on finding that neutral spine.

  • BREATHE

    • As we inhale, our pelvic floor gently descends and relaxes and as we exhale it gently lifts and contracts. This is a normal progression with diaphragmatic breathing that naturally helps to activate the deep abdominal muscles and stabilize the pelvic region with the breath

  • Balance strength and mobility

    • All movements should be slow and intentional with a focus on maintaining task-specific IAP. This intention trickles down to balancing strength and mobility so we aren’t over-stretching or strengthening a muscle that does not have its full range of motion

  • Work the glutes and adductors in synergy through movement

  • Work all of the core together

Mama, if you are struggling with pubic symphysis pain or any pelvic pain, I understand the frustration, anger and fear that comes along with it. I believe that no woman should have to suffer through pregnancy or postpartum in pain. Call 331-307-7110 to schedule an appointment today or book online. Not ready yet? That’s OK, schedule a free 15-Minute Healthy Mama strategy session today to discuss your options.

Squats and Pregnancy (Part 2): Squats to take you from "Pregnancy Butt" to Peaches

The Many Faces of Squats during Pregnancy and Postpartum

Did you know there’s a million and one different ways to squat? And guess what, there is not a “best” squat for everyone, find the best squat variation for YOU that works with your goals! Squats are one way to help turn "pregnancy butt" into peaches.

Body Weight Squats during Pregnancy

The first set of squats are great because as parents we frequently get up and down from the ground, chair or couch and it’s great to replicate these movements. Being able to do these squats can help so we don’t get stranded on the ground or trapped under a sleeping baby unable to move. 

  1. Body weight transition from Bear to Squat and Tripod to Squat —> for when you sit on the ground and need to stand
  2. Body Weight Air Squats—>squatting is one of the most basic functional movements we have and it is great to train for everything from sitting on a chair to picking things up off the ground
  3. Box Squats, both Conventional Stance Box Squats and Sumo Stance Box Squats—> If you ever go from sitting in a chair to standing then you already do box squats, so let’s focus on doing them correctly and utilizing the glutes to our advantage.

Weighted Squats during Pregnancy

Weighted squats are a great addition to a workout routine. As parents, we must be able to move with weight for everyday function. This includes picking kids up, carrying carseats, putting kids into beds/cribs and even bending down to pick something up from the bottom shelf of the grocery store. It’s important to add weight as it is nearly impossible to go through life without it…as much as we train for birth it is equally important to train for life.

  1. Goblet Squat—> If you are new to lifting weights or need a confidence boost, goblet squats are a great exercise as it moves the load closer to your center of gravity, helping you get into a better position. Better yet, if you can’t squat low, this is a great exercise because the weight helps act as a counterbalance making it a little bit easier so you can train for progress
  2. Front Squat—> This is a great squat variation for those looking to improve flexibility while strengthening the upper back and quads
  3. Back Squats—> A back squat can help improve overall glute, low back and hip strength
  4. Bulgarian Split Squat—> This squat help you get both deep and low into your squat, allowing for the pelvic outlet to fully open. Added bonus in the fact it helps prevent muscle imbalances, challenges mobility, all while recruiting the glutes and improving core strength and stability

Improving Squat Mobility while Pregnant

Needing a little TLC to get into the squat position? Try some squat therapy to help mobilize the hips and upper back to get you to a better squat today! Also, did you know that not being able to do a squat could be caused by anything from foot mobility to a tight upper back? If you are looking to improve your squat, give us a call at (331) 307-7110 to schedule an appointment today and start building those peaches. 

“You’re Cleared for Exercise”

Simply because we were cleared for exercise doesn’t mean our bodies can handle weightlifting or running without creating pain or causing urinary leakage. Just because we were cleared doesn’t mean certain movements will cause or worsen a diastasis recti or abdominal tenting/coning.